The Role of a Manager

Are you considering a career in management but you aren’t sure what exactly your role would involve? Management can be defined as “the attainment of organisational goals in an effective and efficient manner through planning, organising, leading and controlling organisational resources.”

Henri Fayol, an early 20th century French mine manager, is widely regarded as the founder of modern management. He was the first to identify functions common to managers at all levels, in all industries. The idea of management functions is still at the core of management think­ing and a fifth function, staffing, has been added to Fayol’s original four of planning, organis­ing, leading and controlling.

Performance

· Attain goals

· Products

· Services

· Efficiency

· Effectiveness

Organising

Assign responsibility for task accomplishment

Planning

Select goals and ways to attain them

Leading

Use influence to motivate employees

Controlling

Monitor activities and make connections

Resources

· Human

· Financial

· Raw materials

· Technological

· Information

Planning involves establishing goals and objectives and scheduling activities and resources to achieve them. Today, planning also involves innovating and making continual im­provements, however small, in order to succeed. No matter how well we do things, failing to make improvements is a recipe for disaster in today’s rapidly changing environment. Effective planning involves:

  • Determining the organisation’s goals and decide how best to achieve them.
  • Setting goals and objectives i.e. strategic, operational, team and individual
  • Developing action plans to achieve the goals
  • Innovation and continuous improvement

Planning is supported by effective problem solving and decision-making:

  • Step 1: Identify the problem clearly.
  • Step 2: Establish objectives.
  • Step 3: Analyse the problem to determine its cause.
  • Step 4: Generate alternative solutions – brainstorming.
  • Step 5: Evaluate alternatives and select the most suitable.

Organising means defining roles and responsibilities, and arranging and coordinating the re­sources needed to successfully carry out the plans. This includes ensuring that the right people with the right skills, and the right materials, equipment, machines, time, and money, are avail­able when and where they are needed. Managers who organise themselves have good prospects for organising the work of their teams.

Leading involves motivating staff to work in the best interests of the organisation and supporting, guiding, influencing and inspiring others.

Controlling is linked to planning and involves monitoring, evaluation and actioning as necessary, ongoing activities to facilitate goal achievement.  Key performance indicators provide the measurable standards e. g. budgets, staff turnover, absenteeism and workplace safety.

Staffing involves attracting the right people to the organisation, training them to do their job effectively and treating them well to retain their valuable services.

This is a broad overview of what the managers are generally responsible for. Next week we will look at the role of a Frontline Manager.

The Pivot Institute run a fantastic program Diploma of Management in Broome, Derby and online. For more details please call (08) 9221 1803.

Copyright of the Pivot Institute 2015.

The Role of a Manager

Are you considering a career in management but you aren’t sure what exactly your role would involve? Management can be defined as “the attainment of organisational goals in an effective and efficient manner through planning, organising, leading and controlling organisational resources.”

Henri Fayol, an early 20th century French mine manager, is widely regarded as the founder of modern management. He was the first to identify functions common to managers at all levels, in all industries. The idea of management functions is still at the core of management think­ing and a fifth function, staffing, has been added to Fayol’s original four of planning, organis­ing, leading and controlling.

Performance

· Attain goals

· Products

· Services

· Efficiency

· Effectiveness

Organising

Assign responsibility for task accomplishment

Planning

Select goals and ways to attain them

Leading

Use influence to motivate employees

Controlling

Monitor activities and make connections

Resources

· Human

· Financial

· Raw materials

· Technological

· Information

Planning involves establishing goals and objectives and scheduling activities and resources to achieve them. Today, planning also involves innovating and making continual im­provements, however small, in order to succeed. No matter how well we do things, failing to make improvements is a recipe for disaster in today’s rapidly changing environment. Effective planning involves:

  • Determining the organisation’s goals and decide how best to achieve them.
  • Setting goals and objectives i.e. strategic, operational, team and individual
  • Developing action plans to achieve the goals
  • Innovation and continuous improvement

Planning is supported by effective problem solving and decision-making:

  • Step 1: Identify the problem clearly.
  • Step 2: Establish objectives.
  • Step 3: Analyse the problem to determine its cause.
  • Step 4: Generate alternative solutions – brainstorming.
  • Step 5: Evaluate alternatives and select the most suitable.

Organising means defining roles and responsibilities, and arranging and coordinating the re­sources needed to successfully carry out the plans. This includes ensuring that the right people with the right skills, and the right materials, equipment, machines, time, and money, are avail­able when and where they are needed. Managers who organise themselves have good prospects for organising the work of their teams.

Leading involves motivating staff to work in the best interests of the organisation and supporting, guiding, influencing and inspiring others.

Controlling is linked to planning and involves monitoring, evaluation and actioning as necessary, ongoing activities to facilitate goal achievement.  Key performance indicators provide the measurable standards e. g. budgets, staff turnover, absenteeism and workplace safety.

Staffing involves attracting the right people to the organisation, training them to do their job effectively and treating them well to retain their valuable services.

This is a broad overview of what the managers are generally responsible for. Next week we will look at the role of a Frontline Manager.

The Pivot Institute run a fantastic program Diploma of Management in Broome, Derby and online. For more details please call (08) 9221 1803.

Copyright of the Pivot Institute 2015.